Posted by Steven Sawyer on 2/9/2020

A home inspection is a crucial part of the homebuying process. At this point, a home inspector will walk through a house with you and examine the property inside and out. If a home inspector identifies underlying problems with a residence, these issues could put your purchase in jeopardy. On the other hand, if a home inspection reveals that there are no major problems with a residence, you may feel comfortable proceeding with a purchase.

Ultimately, how a homebuyer approaches a property inspection can have far-flung effects. For those who want to achieve the best-possible home inspection results, we're here to help you get ready for a house inspection.

Let's take a look at three tips to ensure you know exactly how to approach a house inspection.

1. Prepare for the Best- and Worst-Case Scenarios

Regardless of how a home inspection turns out, you need to be ready. That way, you'll have a plan in place to act quickly, even in the worst-case scenario.

In the best-case scenario after a house inspection, you likely will take a step forward in your quest to complete a home purchase. Conversely, in the worst-case scenario following a home inspection, you may rescind your offer to purchase a house and reenter the real estate market.

It also is important to remember that you can always walk away from a house sale if an inspection reveals there are significant problems with a residence. For a homebuyer, it is paramount to feel comfortable with a house after an inspection. If a home raises lots of red flags during an inspection, a buyer should have no trouble removing his or her offer to purchase a house.

2. Ask Plenty of Questions

A home inspector is a property expert who can provide insights into the condition of a residence. Thus, you should rely on this property expert as much as possible.

Don't hesitate to discuss a home with an inspector. Because if you ask lots of questions during a home inspection, you may be able to receive comprehensive property insights that you may struggle to obtain elsewhere.

3. Analyze the Inspection Results Closely

Following a home inspection, you'll receive a report that details a property inspector's findings. Review this report closely, and if you have follow-up questions about it, reach out to the inspector that provided the report.

Lastly, as you look for ways to streamline the homebuying journey, you should work with a knowledgeable real estate agent. This housing market professional can put you in touch with the top home inspectors in your city or town. Plus, if you want to request home repairs or a reduced price on a house after an inspection, a real estate agent will negotiate with a seller's agent on your behalf.

Let's not forget about the support that a real estate agent provides at other points in the homebuying journey, either. If you ever have concerns or questions during the homebuying journey, a real estate agent will respond to them at your convenience.

Prepare for a home inspection, and you can use this evaluation to gain the insights you need to make an informed homebuying decision.





Posted by Steven Sawyer on 9/1/2019

Getting a professional inspection is one of the most important parts of closing on a home. An inspection can save you endless time and money if it catches repairs that need to be made, and it can draw your attention to any problems that could be dangerous to you and your family.

Many buyers, especially those who are buying a home for the first time, arenít sure what to expect during a home inspection. They might have questions that theyíre afraid to ask the inspector, or they might feel like they should be asking questions but donít know the right ones to ask.

In this article, weíll give you the rundown on the home inspection process. Weíll explain how to get started, what to expect on inspection day, and what to do with your findings.

Contingency clauses

Before closing on a home, itís important to make sure your offer involves a contingency clause, otherwise known as a ďdue diligence contingency.Ē This section of your contract gives you the right to perform a home inspection within a given number of days.

Sellers may inform you that they have recently had the home inspected and even offer to show you the results of the inspection. However, it is best practice to have your own inspection performed with a trusted professional.

After your offer is accepted, you should begin calling and getting quotes from inspectors immediately.

Before the inspection

Once youíve considered your options of inspectors and chosen an inspector, itís time to schedule your inspection. Both you and your real estate agent should attend the inspection.

Youíll both have the opportunity to ask questions. However, itís a good idea to write down your minor questions and ask them before or after the inspection so that the professional youíve hired is able to focus on their work to do the best possible job inspecting your future home.

During the inspection

The inspection itself is pretty straightforward. Your inspector will examine the exterior and interior of your home, including several vital components and then will provide you with a report of their findings.

They will inform you of repairs that need to be made now, parts of the home that should be monitored for future repairs, and anything that poses a safety concern to you and your family.

The parts of your home the inspector will review include:

  • Roof

  • Exterior Walls

  • Foundation

  • Garage

  • Land grading

  • Plumbing

  • Electrical

  • Heating, ventilation, air conditioning

  • Appliances

There are some things your inspection wonít include. For example, mold, termite damage, and other issues that arenít easily observable without causing damage might be missed by your inspector and will require a specialist.

After the inspection

Once the inspection is complete, you will have the chance to ask any remaining questions. You can review the findings of your inspection report and make decisions about how you want to handle any repairs that need to be made.

You may choose to ask the seller to make the repairs noted in your inspection report. If they refuse, you can withdraw from your contract at any time.


Ultimately, the choice will be yours what to do with the findings from the inspection. But having one can save you immeasurable money on impending repairs that you may not have been aware of.





Posted by Steven Sawyer on 3/17/2019

A home inspection may make or break the property buying journey. If you attend a home inspection and find no major issues with a residence, you may choose to move forward with your house purchase. However, if a home inspection reveals significant problems, you may decide to rework a home purchase agreement or walk away from this agreement altogether.

If you plan to purchase a home, it generally is a good idea to include a home inspection in your property buying strategy. And if you know how to plan for a house inspection, you can use this evaluation to gain the insights you need to make a data-driven decision about a home purchase.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help you prepare for a home inspection.

1. Hire an Expert Home Inspector

With an expert home inspector at your side, you can gain comprehensive insights into a house's overall condition. Then, you can obtain an in-depth inspection report to help you weigh the pros and cons of purchasing a residence.

It is important to conduct an extensive search for the best home inspectors in your area. Search for home inspectors who boast many years of industry experience and come highly recommended from past clients. By doing so, you can find a home inspector who will meet your expectations.

2. Craft a Home Inspection Checklist

It often helps to enter a home inspection with a checklist. If you have a checklist in hand, you should have no trouble conducting a full home evaluation.

You should include all areas of a residence's interior and exterior in your home inspection checklist. Furthermore, you should include a home's heating and cooling system, roof and other key parts of a house in your checklist.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

Preparing for a home inspection may prove to be stressful. Thankfully, a real estate agent can help you get ready for a home inspection and ensure you can make the best-possible decision regarding a house purchase.

A real estate agent is a homebuying expert who is happy to help you at all stages of the property buying journey. In the days leading up to a home inspection, a real estate agent can respond to any of your concerns or questions so you can prepare for the evaluation. Next, on the day of the inspection, a real estate agent will attend the evaluation with you. And after the inspection is complete, you and your real estate agent can discuss the assessment results and determine how to proceed.

Ultimately, a real estate agent can help you streamline the home inspection process. He or she may even be able to put you in touch with the top house inspectors in your area, thereby increasing the likelihood that you can identify any major property issues before you finalize a home purchase.

Ready to conduct a home inspection? Use the aforementioned tips, and you can enter a home inspection as an informed property buyer.





Posted by Steven Sawyer on 6/17/2018

There is a lot that goes into the buying and selling of a home Not only are there many steps to take but it can feel like there is a report for everything. Itís easy to forget what they are or why they are necessary.

Three processes that seem similar to home buyers are the home inspection, comparative market analysis, and the appraisal.

Hereís what each them is and how they are different:

First, letís look at the home inspection.

The home inspection

What it is:

This is probably the one you are most familiar with and have heard the most about. During a home inspection, an inspector is paid to come and test all of the appliances, outlets, plumbing as well as the heating and cooling system.

What this information is for:  

This information is for you the buyer, It is to help make a well-informed decision as to whether the investment you are making is worth the current state of the home. Whether there be repairs that will have to be made or replacements that will need to happen down the line.

The custom market analysis or CMA

What it is:

A sales report your real estate compiles using data they have exclusive access to. This data is compiled into a database used solely by other real estate agents.

What this information is for:

A CMA is used by you and your agent to determine if an asking/selling price is fair. Youíll be able to compare the pricing to other listings and conclude whether it is higher, lower or on par with other offers. This is incredibly useful no matter which end of the spectrum you plan on selling or buying.

An appraisal

What it is: A licensed appraiser comes to visit the home and inspect it solely for value. This is determined by the location, state of and surroundings of the home. Your potential home will be compared to other similar properties in the area to come to a conclusive value.

What this information is for:

The final approval of your mortgage terms by your lender. If the determined value is much lower than your offering price you can be declined a mortgage.

As you can see, each of these processes has varying impact on the final purchase of your home. The information obtained from a home inspection is up to solely your discretion. That gathered from the CMA helps you to determine where the asking price of a home is sitting in comparison to others on the market. And in turn, whether youíve got a really great deal on your hands or an inflated price. And lastly, perhaps the most important is the appraisal. The information gathered from this process is what your lender uses to determined whether or not to lend you the requested amount.




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Categories: appraisal   home inspection   cma  




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